Contact: Ryan Baldwin (202) 249-6517  
Email: ryan_baldwin@americanchemistry.com

WASHINGTON (October 5, 2015) - The White House today announced that trade ministers from the 12 nations that make up the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) reached an agreement today in Atlanta, effectively bringing the negotiations to a close. American Chemistry Council (ACC) President and CEO  Cal Dooley issued the following statement:

"ACC applauds President Obama and his negotiating team for reaching an agreement on TPP, which has the potential to provide significant benefits for the U.S. economy. As the president made clear, TPP will help strengthen the middle class, support job growth at home and create a more predictable regulatory environment for trans-Pacific trade, which presents a key growth opportunity for U.S. chemical manufacturers.

"America's chemical manufacturing sector continues to play a major role in supporting our country's increased competitiveness. We are one of the nation's leading export industries, with $191 billion in chemical exports in 2014 , accounting for 14 percent of all U.S. exports. According to a recent ACC report, exports of shale-gas advantaged chemicals could double by 2030 , which, given our early position in the supply chain, can help our industry drive increased investment and growth throughout the economy. To realize this growth, however, we must continue to gain access to important markets, not just in the pacific region, but across the Atlantic as well.

"ACC also recognizes members of the House and Senate for granting President Obama the negotiating power he needed to start realizing America's historic international trade agenda. In the few months that remain in 2015, we urge Congress to capitalize on this momentum by swiftly approving this historic trade agreement."

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