Jennifer Scott (202) 249-6512
Email: jennifer_scott@americanchemistry.com

Bill Addresses Longstanding Problems with Implementation Process

WASHINGTON (April 28, 2016) - The American Chemistry Council (ACC) issued the following statement welcoming the introduction of the "Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2016" by Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.). On October 1, 2015, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) lowered the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to 70 parts per billion. A companion bill in the House is H.R. 4775 .

"We applaud Senator Capito for striving to fix the implementation process for new EPA ozone standards. Her bill will help ensure that manufacturers who want to invest in the U.S. are able to obtain regulatory permits in a timely, transparent and efficient manner. It's another example of Senator Capito's steadfast support for American manufacturing and job growth.

"EPA's new ozone standards took effect on December 28, 2015, and manufacturing facilities must obtain a permit in order to proceed with a construction or expansion project. Yet too often, EPA fails to provide crucial implementation rules and guidance - delays that can last for years and put investment and hiring at risk.

"The 'Ozone Standards Implementation Act' will help. It sets a ten-year interval for NAAQS reviews, requires EPA to issue guidance concurrent with any new standards and leaves the 2008 permitting requirements in effect until nonattainment areas for the new standards are declared. These and other reforms will provide greater regulatory certainty for state air-quality agencies and businesses alike.

"We commend Senator Capito along with Senators Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.), John McCain (R-Ariz.) and John Cornyn (R-Texas). We look forward to working with them to expedite passage."

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