Contact: Jennifer Scott (202) 249-6512  

WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 29, 2011) - The American Chemistry Council (ACC) today welcomed elements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s proposed standards for cooling water intake structures at manufacturing facilities and power plants. However, ACC believes changes are needed given the high compliance costs anticipated for the rule.

"We welcome the flexibility provided in these proposed standards," said Mike Walls , ACC Vice President of Regulatory and Technical Affairs. "By avoiding a 'one size fits all' approach, the rules can be more effective and achievable. Businesses will be able to develop site-specific compliance plans and apply the most advanced technologies.

"We remain concerned about the rules' high compliance costs," Walls continued. "Although EPA estimated capital costs of $40,000 per facility over ten years, ACC projects costs of $185,000 to $1 million per technology. EPA can mitigate these impacts by raising the exemption threshold and enhancing a facility's flexibility in technology choices. By exempting some smaller facilities and broadening compliance options, EPA can issue final standards that reflect true impacts."

ACC will file comments on the proposed rule by the 90-day deadline.


News & Resources

View our resource center to find press releases, testimonies, infographics and more.


Jobs and Economic Impact

More than 800,000 Americans rely on jobs in the chemistry industry—earning 47 percent more than the average manufacturing wage.