Contact: Lisa Dry (202) 249-6523
Email: lisa_dry@americanchemistry.com  

Three Convenient Learning Options for Industry Professionals

WASHINGTON (March 11, 2016) - To meet growing demand, the American Chemistry Council's (ACC) Center for the Polyurethanes Industry (CPI) is offering a number of exciting new educational opportunities for the polyurethane industry. The expanded offerings provide information about recent advancements in color science and colorant technology along with polyurethane chemistry. These additions were created to help members expand their knowledge further with the already robust offerings.

At the same time, CPI is creating a hub to make it easier for members to access and benefit from the wide range of services. The new hub-the CPI Education Center -will serve both industry newcomers and veterans, helping everyone stay current with the latest advances in technology, regulations and emerging issues. The CPI Education Center is an evolving resource for polyurethane professionals around the globe and throughout the value chain, to expand their knowledge of the polyurethane industry.

"For more than a decade, CPI has provided the industry with the most up-to-date information about polyurethane," noted Lee Krinzman, CPI manager, industry affairs. "Now through the CPI Education Center we are adding diverse learning opportunities and expanding our course offerings to better meet the needs of the industry. Our courses are unmatched in providing participants information to increase their knowledge of the polyurethane industry, no matter what stage they are at in their career." The CPI Education Center will continue to provide opportunities that keep industry professionals on top of the latest regulations, trends and issue developments by offering three convenient ways to learn:

» Learn more about the CPI Education Center

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