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Impacts for Manufacturers Are Among Key Concerns

WASHINGTON (June 4, 2015) - The American Chemistry Council (ACC) issued the following statement in response to a House Science, Space and Technology Committee  hearing this morning, "EPA Regulatory Overreach: Impacts on American Competitiveness."

"We commend  Chairman Smith and members of the Committee for taking a hard look at EPA's regulations and their cumulative impacts for U.S. competitiveness. New rules such as the Clean Power Plan and National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone will have an outsized impact on American manufacturers, who compete on a global basis and need a timely, transparent and cost-effective regulatory process in order to grow .

"The Clean Power Plan is a case in point. It's an unprecedented attempt to regulate the entire economy through energy markets, which could harm grid reliability and increase energy costs. These issues are of particular concern to the chemical industry, a major energy consumer. EPA's final plan must be designed and implemented in a way that lets manufacturers obtain competitively-priced energy.

"The Agency's proposed lower ozone standard is a non-starter across much of the country. At the lower end of the proposed range, more than 2000 counties-urban and rural-will be unable to comply, based on EPA's most recent data. Manufacturing growth could slow or stop in these 'nonattainment areas,' where burdensome and costly regulatory requirements create uncertainty in investment projects that can ultimately make them not worth the trouble.

"We urge every lawmaker to help reform a regulatory process that has substantial economic implications and will play a decisive role in the future of American manufacturing."

» View full statement for the record


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