Contact: Patrick Hurston (202) 249-6506  
Email: patrick_hurston@americanchemistry.com

NAPLES, Fla. (November 7, 2014) - The American Chemistry Council (ACC) announced today at its board of directors meeting that Chevron Phillips Chemical Company President and CEO Peter L. Cella will become the Council's newest board officer, effective January 1, 2015.

"Creating an environment that recognizes the need for and value of sound, science-based public policy is central to our mission at ACC," said ACC President and CEO Cal Dooley . "As President and CEO of a company that produces the intermediary products essential to more than 70,000 household, commercial, and industrial products across dozens of market sectors, Peter Cella understands the urgency for policies that support economic growth and innovation, while protecting public health and the environment," Dooley added. "His insight, experience and leadership will help to ensure ACC's continued success as we promote the role of American chemistry in our country's global manufacturing future."
  
"Shale resource development has revitalized the petrochemicals industry and triggered a project boom that is changing the face of the U.S. economy," said Cella. "While in the midst of a manufacturing renaissance, we hope to inspire public policies that support sustainable economic growth and protect the environment."

Following formal approval by the board of directors, Cella will first assume the role of Vice Chairman of the Board and chair of the Council's Board Finance, Audit and Membership Committee. He'll serve in this capacity for one year, followed by a one year term each as Chairman of the Executive Committee and Chairman of the Board. Cella began serving on ACC's board of directors in February, 2011. He currently holds a seat on the Council's Executive Committee and the Finance, Audit, and Membership Committee.

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