Contact: Jennifer Killinger (202) 249-6619  
Email: Jennifer_killinger@americanchemistry.com

WASHINGTON (October 6, 2015) - The  Plastics-to-Fuel and Petrochemistry Alliance (PFPA) today announced that  Vadxx Energy will become its newest member. Cleveland-based Vadxx-which plans to start up its first commercial facility in Akron, Ohio, in the coming months-joins Agilyx , Cynar Plc , and  RES Polyflow as the alliance's core member technology providers.

"Vadxx is excited to join the Alliance in its work to educate policymakers, communities and others about the important benefits of these new technologies," said Vadxx CEO Jim Garrett . "In addition to creating valuable fuels and chemical feedstocks, plastics-to-fuel technologies can help divert non-recycled plastics from landfills and lower greenhouse gas emissions."

Formerly, the Plastics-to-Oil Technologies Alliance, the PFPA recently modified its name to reflect the wide range of versatile technologies and products offered by its membership. These include liquid fuels such as diesel and naphtha, crude oil for conversion to fuels or chemicals, and waxes, lubricants and other valuable products.

Since forming in 2014, the group also has been joined by three associate members, Sealed Air , Americas Styrenics , and Tetra Tech .

"More businesses, governments and communities are looking to value creation as a new paradigm for managing post-use materials," said Michael Dungan, chairman of the PFPA and director of sales and marketing for RES Polyflow. "The diverse and expanding group of technologies available to  convert non-recycled plastics into fuels and other valuable products provides a range of solutions to help communities sustainably manage more of their post-use resources."

Follow PFPA on Twitter @PlasticsToFuel .

» Learn more about the Plastics-to-Fuel and Petrochemistry Alliance

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