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Jon Corley
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WASHINGTON (June 22, 2017) – In response to the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) release of its scoping documents for conducting risk evaluations on the first 10 chemicals under an updated Toxic Substances Control Act as amended by the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act (LCSA), the American Chemistry Council today issued the following statement:

“With the release of its scoping documents for the initial 10 chemicals for risk evaluation, EPA has further demonstrated a good faith commitment to meeting LCSA’s statutory deadlines for implementing the Act in an efficient manner. In addition, we are pleased EPA has opened dockets in order to receive public comment and additional data relevant to the scoping documents to inform EPA’s development of Problem Formulation documents on these chemicals.

“In the coming days, we will review and analyze the scoping documents to ensure that they are based on best available, verified information as well as focused on the conditions of use that present the greatest potential risks so that the risk evaluations are protective and practical.

“It is imperative that the risk evaluations for these first 10 chemicals, and all future risk evaluations, are grounded on the best available science and the weight of the scientific evidence, as required by Section 26 of LCSA.

“We will continue to engage constructively with the Agency in support of efficient and effective implementation of LCSA. Successful implementation of this important, bipartisan legislation is essential to ensuring protections for human health and environment, while enabling our industry to continue to innovate, create jobs and grow the economy.”

» Learn more about the Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act

» Implementing LCSA to Effectively Regulate Chemicals in Commerce

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