Contact Us

Jon Corley
(202) 249-6524

WASHINGTON (June 22, 2017) – The American Chemistry Council today commended the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on release of its final rules for the processes and procedures it will use to reset the Toxic Substances Control Act inventory, prioritize chemicals for review and conduct risk evaluations of high-priority substances as required by the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act (LCSA):

“LCSA established tough but achievable deadlines for completing three essential rulemakings. We commend EPA for meeting the deadlines. The inventory reset, prioritization and risk evaluation rules are central to the efficient, high quality chemical risk evaluations envisioned under LCSA. Congress demanded these framework rules work in tandem to foster a national chemical management system focused on the high priority chemicals actually in commerce that require risk evaluations.

“Over the coming days, we will analyze the rules in detail. It is our expectation that under these rules, EPA will not simply meet the minimal requirements of the law, but instead establish the framework for a modern chemical management system capable of meeting 21st century demands. The processes established by these rules are fundamental to EPA’s ability to quickly and efficiently assess chemicals and uses for their priority, evaluate priority risks and take action to manage risks where required. With appropriate resources, and by leveraging the experience of other governments such as Canada, as well as information from manufacturers and other stakeholders, EPA can and should exceed congressional expectations and ensure that LCSA is recognized as the new premier chemical regulation in the world.”

» Learn more about the Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act

» Implementing LCSA to Effectively Regulate Chemicals in Commerce

News

News & Resources

View our resource center to find press releases, testimonies, infographics and more.

Jobs

Jobs and Economic Impact

The business of chemistry provides 811,000 skilled, good-paying American jobs—earning 44 percent more than the average manufacturing pay.