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WASHINGTON (September 18, 2017) – Members of the Silicones Environmental, Health and Safety Center (SEHSC), a sector group of the American Chemistry Council (ACC), submitted a Final Report of the results of the D4 environmental monitoring program to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Actual environmental concentrations measured in samples collected during the program will facilitate EPA’s environmental risk assessment for D4, which is primarily used as an intermediate to make silicone polymers.

“Based on a preliminary assessment of the data, SEHSC continues to believe that no regulatory restrictions are needed,” said Karluss Thomas, Senior Director of SEHSC, ACC’s Chemical Products and Technology Division (CPTD). “The silicones industry is pursuing an independent, peer-reviewed environmental risk evaluation of the data submitted as part of the ECA. Our industry stands ready to provide additional technical support as EPA contemplates the risk evaluation process for D4.”

SEHSC is committed to working together with EPA to ensure the highest-quality science is used in the risk evaluation process. The study illustrates an important industry-government collaboration to obtain a robust set of real-world environmental exposure data. SEHSC directly worked with EPA to design and wholly fund the complex environmental monitoring program, which consisted of collecting samples from 14 sites across the country.

“The critical monitoring data generated through this study resulted from industry and the agency cooperatively working together to design and implement a rigorous environmental monitoring program,” said Thomas. “In its evaluation of D4, the silicones industry encourages EPA to take a risk-based approach using the best available science, including the real-world exposure data from this D4 monitoring program, consistent with the mandates of the recently amended Toxic Substances Control Act.”

More than 99% of D4 is used as an intermediate to make products that provide vital societal benefits from a variety of industries, including: transportation, building and construction, health care, and electronics.

To learn more, view these frequently asked questions or visit sehsc.americanchemistry.com.

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