ACC Trade Policy Positions

Contact Us

Ryan Baldwin
(202) 249-6517

Consistent with ACC’s Trade Policy Principles, ACC and its members advocate for trade liberalization policies that seek to eliminate tariffs and non-tariff barriers to trade between the United States and its multilateral trading partners.

Given the importance of chemicals to U.S. manufacturing competitiveness and export growth, ACC is recognized as a constructive stakeholder and leading voice on top trade policy issues, including the United-States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, U.S. China trade negotiations, and the Section 232 tariffs on steel and aluminum.


United-States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA):

ACC supports U.S. ratification of the USMCA in 2019. Canada and Mexico are the U.S. chemicals industry’s two largest exporting markets. The new USMCA agreement, which features a Sectoral Annex for Chemical Substances, will enable U.S. chemicals manufacturers to create a North American model for chemical regulation while leveraging the highly-integrated, North American supply chain to reduce costs, boost U.S. exports, and stimulate growth and job creation throughout the region.

The Latest:


« back to top

Tariffs on U.S. Imports from Mexico / Immigration Concerns:

ACC stands with our business and coalition partners in urging the President and Congress to find a better way (other than tariffs) to secure our borders.

Around $543 million in chemical products cross the U.S.-Mexico border every week, and Mexico purchases more U.S.-made chemicals than any other trading partner – nearly $23 billion in 2018. A trade war between the U.S. and Mexico would potentially undermine USMCA negotiations and erect huge cost barriers between American manufacturers and the products they depend on to succeed.

The Latest:


« back to top

Section 301 Tariffs / U.S.-China Trade Negotiations:

ACC supports a meaningful, enforceable, tariff-free, and long-term resolution to ongoing trade talks between the U.S. and China. China is the U.S. industry’s third-largest export market.

U.S. chemical manufacturers obtain several chemicals critical to their processes – and that are not available anywhere else in the world – from China. To date, more than 1,500 chemicals and plastics imports from China, valued at $26.5 billion, have been targeted across all four U.S. tariff lists. Retaliatory tariffs by China have hit more than 1,000 U.S. chemicals and plastics exports, worth an estimated $11 billion. ACC is starting to see signs that the tariffs are disrupting supply chains, cutting off markets, and eroding U.S. chemical manufacturing competitiveness. ACC continues to urge U.S. and China to withdraw all tariffs already in place and bring an immediate end to the trade war.

The Latest:


« back to top

Section 232 Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum Imports:

ACC opposes the 25 percent tariff in imported steel and 10 percent tariff on imported aluminum that went into effect in March 2018 under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962.

In May 2019, ACC applauded the U.S. Administration for removing the tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Mexico and Canada without imposing harmful quotas. Any tariffs and quotas on steel and aluminum make it harder for U.S. companies to source materials to build multi-billion dollar chemical plants in the United States. According to ACC analysis, about half of the $204 billion in announced new chemical industry investment projects, still in planning stages, would be at risk of delay or abandonment.

The Latest:


« back to top

Possible Section 232 Tariffs on Automobiles and Automotive Parts:

ACC opposes any tariffs resulting from the Section 232 investigation into automobile and auto parts imports.

The U.S. automotive sector is one of the chemical industry’s largest downstream consumers of chemicals. One-fifth of a light vehicle by weight is related to chemistry. A 20 or 25 percent tariff would significant depress demand for new autos in the U.S. and therefore demand for U.S.-made chemicals. ACC continues to urge U.S. officials to avoid the imposition of tariffs and quotas on imports of autos and auto parts.

The Latest:


« back to top

Enforcement of U.S. WTO Rights in Large Civil Aircraft Dispute:

ACC welcomes the Administration’s efforts to address the EU’s alleged subsidization of its large civil aircraft industry. However, we believe the United States should abstain from exercising its right to levy tariffs on U.S. imports of European goods at this time and resolve the dispute through more diplomatic means. Failure to do so would likely trigger EU countermeasures that would lead to another harmful market closure for U.S. chemical manufacturers.

The U.S. and EU aviation industries rely on chemicals and products made with chemicals to make their aircraft safer, faster, and more efficient. Higher tariffs on aircraft and aircraft components would raise prices for those goods in both markets. The higher prices would weaken demand for civil aircraft, and ultimately lead to less demand for U.S.-made chemicals.

We continue to urge both sides to negotiate an agreement without imposing their respective countermeasure lists.

The Latest:


« back to top

Miscellaneous Tariff Bill:

ACC is a strong supporter of the Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB) Act of 2018, which temporarily reduces or eliminates tariffs on $1.1 billion in products produced outside of the United States.

An estimated $642 million (66 percent of the total savings) from the MTB are associated with chemicals and plastics/plastic products. Although the additional tariffs that the Administration imposed over the past year have undermined the competitiveness of U.S. chemical manufacturers and their ability to leverage global supply chains, the situation would have been much worse had the MTB not been enacted in 2018.

The Latest:


« back to top

Negotiations with U.S. Trading Partners:

ACC supports the Administration’s ongoing consideration of modernizing U.S. trading relationships and developing new agreements. ACC welcomed the opportunity to testify in 2018 and 2019 on the chemical industry’s priorities for potential trade negotiations with the European Union, United Kingdom, and Japan. Our top priorities for the negotiations include eliminating tariffs, enhancing regulatory cooperation, and modernizing rules of origin.

The Latest:


« back to top
News

News & Resources

View our resource center to find press releases, testimonies, infographics and more.

Jobs