Welcome to the New & Improved AmericanChemistry.com

Applications & Benefits

CONTACT US
Lee Salamone
CONTACT US

Polyurethanes are one of the most versatile plastic materials. The nature of the chemistry allows polyurethanes to be adapted to solve challenging problems, to be molded into unusual shapes and to enhance industrial and consumer products by adding comfort, warmth and convenience to our lives.

Polyurethanes are formed by reacting a polyol (an alcohol with more than two reactive hydroxyl groups per molecule) with a diisocyanate or a polymeric isocyanate in the presence of suitable catalysts and additives. Because a variety of diisocyanates and a wide range of polyols can be used to produce polyurethane, a broad spectrum of materials can be produced to meet the needs of specific applications.

It does not matter where you look, you are likely to find polyurethanes. Polyurethanes can be a found in mattresses, couches, insulation, liquid coatings and paints, tough elastomers such as roller blade wheels, soft flexible foam toys, some elastic fibers, and many other places and applications.

It all starts with the chemistry of the two primary materials used to make polyurethane products—methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) and toluene diisocyanate (TDI). A major reaction of MDI and TDI in the environment is formation of solid inert polyureas from reaction with water.

MDI

5 Million metric tons of methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) are manufactured and used worldwide each year in the production of polyurethanes.

This material is well controlled, and only small amounts — from milligrams to a few grams per ton MDI used — are released into the environment. A major reaction of MDI in the environment is the formation of solid inert polyureas from reaction with water. In use, MDI is reacted with polyols to form many different polyurethane products. Polyurethanes are shown to be stable in the environment and on disposal, and have no adverse impact on municipal waste handling processes, landfills or incineration.

TDI

2 Million metric tons of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) are manufactured and used worldwide each year in the production of polyurethanes.

This material is well controlled, and only small amounts — a few grams per ton TDI used — are released into the environment. A major reaction of TDI in the environment is the formation of solid inert polyureas from reaction with water. In use, TDI is reacted with polyols to form many different polyurethane products. Polyurethanes are shown to be stable in the environment and on disposal, and have no adverse impact on municipal waste handling processes, landfills or incineration.

Another key contributor to protecting the environment is in the handling of these materials. CPI member companies take great care in material handling—whether at their own sites or working with customers. This helps prevent unwanted emissions and is part of ACC member companies commitment to Responsible Care® practices.

We use cookies to personalize content and ads, to provide social media features, and to analyze our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.

Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions